Paraphonic parts

Non-chord tracks can still be made to play multiple notes at a time (up to four-note chords). This can be accomplished by sound-designing a paraphonic patch, or choosing one of the paraphonic presets.

A paraphonic patch is a type of synthesizer patch that allows multiple voices to be played simultaneously but not independently. This means that while multiple notes can be played at the same time, they will all be subject to the same modulation and control.

On your Woovebox, paraphonic patch sound-design is subject to some limitations with regards to oscillator selection and algorithm selection. However there are also added flexibilities.

To create a paraphonic patch, special oscillator models must be selected for the oscillator wave types ('WAvE'/1 on the 'Osc1' and 'Osc2' pages). The special oscillator models inject two pitches at once into the oscillators under certain conditions. The pitches are determined by the chord playing on the 'Cd' (chord) track; they are automatically transposed relative to playing chord's root note (therefore set 'FLCh' on the 'GLob' page to 'root'. With two oscillators per voice, this allows for a maximum of four pitches ("notes") being played simultaneously.

The following wave types are automatically transposed and modified depending on the chord playing;

  • SiP1; one or two sine waves; plays the root note and if chord consists of four notes, also plays a second sine wave a the frequency of the third.
  • SiP2; two sine waves; if chord consists of four notes it plays fifth and added tone, else it plays the third and fifth.
  • TrP1; one or two triangle waves; plays the root note and if chord consists of four notes, also plays a second triangle wave a the frequency of the third.
  • TrP2; two triangle waves; if chord consists of four notes it plays fifth and added tone, else it plays the third and fifth.
  • SWP1; one or two saw waves; plays the root note and if chord consists of four notes, also plays a second saw wave a the frequency of the third.
  • SWP2; two saw waves; if chord consists of four notes it plays fifth and added tone, else it plays the third and fifth.
  • SqP1; one or two square waves; plays the root note and if chord consists of four notes, also plays a second square wave a the frequency of the third.
  • SqP2; two square waves; if chord consists of four notes it plays fifth and added tone, else it plays the third and fifth.

Note that these special oscillators otherwise behave like any other standard oscillator and can thus be combined and modified as normal. However, if the goal is to play multiple notes at once, then care must be taken to not choose algorithms that mute one of the oscillators (e.g. most algorithms except FM2 and Subtractive). The FM2 algorithm, due its "subtractive-style" mixing of the two operators (and thus avoiding muting one of the oscillators) in addition to performing frequency modulation, is a particularly useful algorithm to achieve more interesting timbres.

Because the S1P1, TrP1, SwP1 and SqP1 oscillators behave like single wave oscillators for chords that play only three notes, you can in that case freely substitute these oscillators with any other oscillators for more interesting timbres.

An example of a paraphonic patch from the Woovebox demo track "This". In this example, the patch follows chords programmed on an (intentionally) inaudible chord track.


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