Patterns / Pttn page

If a Track is the member of a band or orchestra, then a pattern is a page of sheet music that each member is reading. Each track can play up to 16 unique patterns, and patterns may be chained if needed. A pattern itself is made up of a maximum of 16 steps. When a pattern plays (press the play button to start or stop playing), each track steps through these steps

By default most tracks step through their patterns at a speed of 16 step (e.g. 4 beats, or one bar) per pattern. The overall speed is determined by the "BPM" setting in the Song settings. However it is possible to modify this speed (see "b.div"/"BPM div" parameter on the "Pttn" page) on a per-pattern basis. Note that, by default, the Chord track is the only exception; the default settings cause the pattern to be stepped through at a slower pace (there "b.div"/"BPM div" is set to divisor of 4 instead of 1, so that a a pattern now takes 4x as long to be stepped through, compared to the other tracks.

It is also possible to change the length of a pattern to something smaller than 16 steps (see "Pt.Ln"/"Ptrn Len" parameter) on a per-pattern basis. Changing the length of a pattern can create complex and interesting sounding polymeters, and can even allow for different time signatures within one song.

Pattern playback can further be influenced by mute/unmute cycling (MU.Ln/UM.Ln/M.U.OF); this can make a a track's playback cut in and out rhythmically. Song mode fragments can further influence how a pattern is played back by applying re-triggering effects and automation.

Given the vast amount of ways patterns and their constituent steps can be modified and transformed, it is possible (and common) to create full, complex sounding songs with just one pattern per track.


1. b.div BPM Divisor

Governs the speed at which the track steps through this pattern. The specified value is a divider, meaning that the default speed (as determined by the "BPM" setting in the Song settings) of is divided by the value; a divisor of 1 yields the default speed, a divisor of 2 doubles the time it takes for the pattern to be played, a divisor of 4 quadruples the time it takes for the pattern to be played and so on.


2. Pt.Ln Pattern Length

Sets the pattern length in steps. Changing the length of a pattern can create complex and interesting sounding polymeters, and allow for different time signatures within one song. Note that changing this setting to below 16, will cause the higher-numbered steps to become unavailable for programming and modification. Trying to program or modify these steps will result in a "ChnG Len" error message, asking you to change the Pt.Ln setting first.


3. Ch.ne Chain Next

Specifies the pattern number that should be played after playing this pattern. A pattern number of "Self" will just keep playing the current pattern into infinity.


4. Ch.rP Chain Repeat

Specifies how many times the current pattern should play before switching to the next pattern (as specified by Ch.nE).


5. Mu.Ln Mute length

Specifies how long the pattern should mute for. If 'Mu.Ln' + 'UM.Ln' does not the equal pattern length (Pt.Ln), interesting polymeters can eventuate. Muting starts when the pattern starts playing, but this position can be offset by the 'Mu.Of' (mute offset parameter) to be later or earlier.


6. UM.Ln Unmute length

Specifies how long the pattern should unmute for. If 'Mu.Ln' + 'UM.Ln' does not the equal pattern length (Pt.Ln), interesting polymeters can eventuate. Unmuting happens after the amount of muting steps specified by 'Mu.Ln' have elapsed.

Note that the time when 'Mu.Ln' begins, can be offset to occur later or earlier using the 'Mu.Of' (mute offset) parameter. This means that it is possible to change 'Mu.Of' in such a way that a pattern starts off unmuted instead; simply set 'Mu.Of' equal to negative 'Mu.Ln'.


7. M.U.OF Mute unmute offset

Unmute shifts/'offsets' the time when the 'Mu.Ln' period begins (later or earlier). This, for example, means that it is possible to change 'Mu.Of' in such a way that a pattern starts off unmuted instead; simply set 'Mu.Of' equal to negative 'Mu.Ln'.


8. Pt.rS Playthrough Counter Reset Behavior

Specifies how playthroughs should be counted for conditional behavior. The following options are available;

  • 'AUdb' (audible); playthrough counter is only reset if track was not playing any pattern before. E.g. the track has now become audible.
  • 'Awys ' (always); playthrough counter is always reset when this pattern starts playing.
  • 'Nevr' (never); playthrough counter is never reset when this pattern starts playing.


9. FLW.C Follow Chord Override

Specifies an optional override of the global ('GLob' page) follow chord (4/FLW.C) behavior.

The same settings are available as for the global "follow chord" parameter with the exception 'GLob' indicating no override (use global setting on 'GLob' page)

  • 'GLob' (no override); use global setting on 'GLob' page.
  • 'LGL'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use case is live recorded or improvised leads.
  • 'trS.1'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the root note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use generative leads.
  • 'trS.2'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the second note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use generative leads.
  • 'trS.3'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the second third of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use generative leads.
  • 'CLS.3'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always play the note of the current chord that is closest in pitch - only the first three notes of the chord are considered. A common use case is arpeggios.
  • 'CLS.A'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always play the note of the current chord that is closest in pitch. A common use case is arpeggios.
  • 'root'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to play the root note of the current chord. A common use case is basslines.

Please note that chord adaptation is ignored if track behavior ('bEhv') is set to "sample kit" ('SMP.K'). The follow chord override option is not available on the chord ('Cd') track itself.


14. Md.Pc MIDI Patch

(firmware 2817+) Selects MIDI Patch change number that should be sent out when this pattern starts playing. Note that the number is 1-based.


15. Md.bM MIDI Patch bank MSB

(firmware 2817+) Selects MIDI Patch bank MSB that should be accompany the patch change that is sent out when this pattern starts playing.


16. Md.bL MIDI Patch bank LSB

(firmware 2817+) Selects MIDI Patch bank LSB that should be accompany the patch change that is sent out when this pattern starts playing.


Context menu

The following options are available on the 'Pttn' page;

  • 'Chn nEXt' (chain next pattern) chains next pattern to the current pattern (see also chaining patterns in the quick start guide).
  • 'Chn 4' (chain next three patterns) chains the next three patterns to the current pattern for a total chain of four patterns (see also chaining patterns in the quick start guide).
  • 'Chn 8' (chain next seven patterns) chains the next seven patterns to the current pattern for a total chain of eight patterns (see also chaining patterns in the quick start guide).
  • 'Chn ALL' (chain all sixteen patterns) chains the next fifteen patterns to the current pattern for a total chain that comprises the full available sixteen patterns (see also chaining patterns in the quick start guide).
  • 'StEP LEn' (step length in milliseconds) shows how long one step takes on this track in milliseconds. Step length is influenced by the song's BPM setting and the current pattern's BPM divider ('b.div'/'bPM div') under the 'Pttn' page's 1/Cd key.


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