1. M.voL Master Volume

Specifies the master volume as a value between 0 (silent) and 127 (max).

Please note that two special options in the context menu ('rais MVL1' and 'rais MVL8') are available that reduce the volume of all other tracks by 1 and 8 respectively, so that the current track will sound comparatively louder in the mix.


2. trSP Transpose

Specifies the amount of semitones (12 semitones is one octave) to transpose any recorded notes before they play.


3. ALGo Synthesis Algorithm

Specifies the algorithm by which the oscillators for this track should be combined. Please see the sound design section for more information.


4. FLW.C Follow Chord

Specifies how (if at all) notes (played or sequenced) on this track should be adapted and transformed to follow the currently playing ('Cd' track) chord. The following settings are available;

  • 'OFF' (off); no adaptation of sequenced notes is performed. Live played notes are adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song.
  • 'LGL'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use case is live recorded or improvised leads.
  • 'trS.1'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the root note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use is generative leads.
  • 'trS.2'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the second note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common useis generative leads.
  • 'trS.3'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the second third of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song. A common use is generative leads.
  • 'CLS.3'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always play the note of the current chord that is closest in pitch - only the first three notes of the chord are considered. A common use case is arpeggios.
  • 'CLS.A'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always play the note of the current chord that is closest in pitch. A common use case is arpeggios.
  • 'root'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to play the root note of the current chord. A common use case is basslines.
  • 'tr.1.5'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the root note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song, inclusive of the root + 7 semitones("fifth") as a valid note. A common use is generative leads.
  • 'tr.2.5'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the second note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song, inclusive of the root + 7 semitones("fifth") as a valid note. A common use is generative leads.
  • 'tr.3.5'. Sequenced and live played notes are transposed by the third note of the chord, and then adapted to always be in the key and scale of the song, inclusive of the root + 7 semitones("fifth") as a valid note. A common use is generative leads.
  • 'CL.3.5'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always play the note of the current chord or root + 7 semitones("fifth") that is closest in pitch - only the first three notes of the chord are considered. A common use case is arpeggios.
  • 'CL.A.5'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to always play the note of the current chord or root + 7 semitones ("fifth") that is closest in pitch. A common use case is arpeggios.
  • 'roo.5'. Sequenced and live played notes are adapted to play the root note or root + 7 semitones ("fifth") of the current chord. A common use case is Motown-style basslines.

Please note that chord adaptation is ignored if track behavior ('bEhv') is set to "sample kit" ('SMP.K'). The follow chord override option is not available on the chord ('Cd') track itself.


5. QLty Spectral Quality

The Spectral Quality ('Qlty') parameter controls a novel signal processing feature that further optimizes DSP usage, that can also be used for creative effects.

In order to save DSP resources, your Woovebox analyses the precise spectral resolution a sound requires during real-time synthesis of a voice. In cases where a lower spectral resolution can be used without impacting the fidelity of the sound, your Woovebox can automatically do so to free up DSP resources. You can also manually force any track to render at a lower resolution, either to save DSP resources or for creative effects.

When automatically determined ('auto') by your Woovebox, the loss in resolution is not (or barely) audible - a little bit like how MP3s trade storage space for audio fidelity. Any resolution reduction determined by 'auto' will only kick in when DSP usage exceeds 70%.

  • 'auto'; lets your Woovebox decide the required spectral resolution to faithfully reproduce the track's patch, saving DSP resources where it can. Tracks with 'auto' set will always render at full ('FuLL') quality spectral resolution when exported via Wooveconnect. Any resolution reduction determined by 'auto' will only kick in when DSP usage exceeds 70%.
  • 'FuLL'; forces full spectral resolution allocation for the track, preventing loss of resolution at all times (e.g. even when that loss would not be perceptible).
  • '50'; forces 50% spectral resolution allocation for the track. Depending on the patch, the effect may be noticeable in the very high frequencies and when applying filters and saturation. In that case, this mode can also be used as a creative effect. Tracks with '50' set will render precisely as audible (e.g. with reduced spectral resolution allocated) when exported to .WAV via Wooveconnect.
  • '25'; forces 25% spectral resolution allocation for the track. Depending on the patch the effect may be noticeable in the high and mid frequencies, as well as when applying filters and saturation. In that case, this mode can also be used as a "lo-fi" creative effect (see lo-fi section). Tracks with '25' set will render precisely as audible (e.g. with reduced spectral resolution allocated) when exported to .WAV via Wooveconnect.

Good candidates for aggressive manual spectral quality optimization are usually patches and sounds with little to no high frequencies playing, such as basses and bass drums.

Please note that you can at any time see how many spectral quality-reduced voices are playing by putting 'DSP Info' (Song globals page) into 'Spec Qual' mode (see Understanding DSP Load section).


6. Snd Sound Category

Describes the general "human-identifiable" sound/role that this track plays in the composition.

For example, tracks set to "lead" ('LEad') will offer lead presets to choose from on the Patch ('Pach') page.

The following sound categories are available;

  • 'Bass' (bass); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a bassline.
  • 'Lead' (lead); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a lead.
  • 'Arpg' (arpeggio); the primary use of the sound on this track is for an arpeggio.
  • 'Chrd' (chord); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a chord.
  • 'Kick' (kick drum); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a kick drum.
  • 'Snre' (snare drum); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a snare drum.
  • 'HiHt' (hi hat); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a hi-hat.
  • 'Perc' (percussion); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a percussive element.
  • 'Para' (paraphonic); the primary use of the sound on this track is for a paraphonic chord.
  • 'Efct' (effect); the primary use of the sound on this track is for an effect.


7. bEhv Track Behavior

Track behavior defines how a track should behave in terms of playback, UI, functionality, stem rendering, file management and more.

For example, tracks set to "sample kit" ('SMP.K') will disable chord adaptation and enable a slice number parameter, allowing up to 16 slices to be triggered per track.

The following behavior types are available;

  • 'Bass' (bass); this track behaves like a bassline.
  • 'Lead' (lead); this track behaves like a lead.
  • 'Arpg' (arpeggio); this track behaves like and arpeggio.
  • 'Kick' (kick); this track behaves like a kick.
  • 'Snre' (snare); this track behaves like a snare drum.
  • 'HiHt' (hi-hat); this track behaves like a hi-hat.
  • 'Perc' (percussion); this track behaves like a percussive instrument.
  • 'SmpL' (sampled instrument); this track behaves like sampled instrument
  • 'SmpK' (sample kit); this track behaves like a sample kit
  • 'Slnt' (silent); this track is silent
  • 'MuIn' (multi-instrument); this track is configured to allow per-step switching between instruments. See also multi-instrument mode.


8. MIdI MIDI channel assign

Specifies the MIDI channel that the track should send its note and controller messages on.


9. SwnG Swing

Specifies the amount of swing that should be applied to notes played on the track.

Swing, also known as shuffle, is a rhythmic feel or groove commonly used in music production. It involves altering the timing and emphasis of notes within a musical phrase, creating a distinctive "swung" or "shuffled" rhythm. The offbeat notes are delayed or played slightly behind the beat, while the downbeat notes are played on the beat.

The SwnG value represents a percentage of travel between the current step and the next step. E.g. a value of 0 will never play any notes belated (swing off), while a value of 50 will play a "swung" note - exactly between two steps.

Swing can greatly influence the overall mood and character of a musical piece. It adds a human touch, injecting a sense of groove, spontaneity, and playfulness into the music. The degree of swing can vary, ranging from a subtle, barely perceptible swing to a pronounced and exaggerated swing feel, depending on the style and context of the music.

Please note that swing is applied on a 4/4 basis, even if your pattern has a non-4/4-compatible length. The result, when applied to polyrythms (for example a bassline with an odd pattern length) can sound be extremely "groovy" yet complex, making the impression a complex bassline was programmed or played live.


10. bt.Cr bit crush

This parameter specifies how many least significant bits should be set ("crushed") to 0, assuming a 16-bit (~96db) nominal dynamic range. Loss of bit-depth will become audible for most humans at around 7 or 8 bits of loss. The effect is typically audible as a quintessential "hiss" in quieter parts of an instrument's decay or release stage, and evokes the quintessential sound of early 80s digital drum machines.

To faithfully emulate the sound of vintage digital audio reproduction circuitry, the bit crushing is performed right after oscillator synthesis and before filtering, effects, dynamics or mixing.

Please note that bit crushing should not be confused with sample rate reduction (for which your Woovebox proovides two other settings/methods).


11. SatU Saturation

Progressively saturates louder parts of the signal, making them sound subtly "warmer" and analog. Please note that this setting interacts with the filter in order to more faithfully emulate analog-style filters (a found in the 303, MS20, etc.) when applied.


12. dist Distortion

Specifies one of two types of distortion and an amount;

  • Positive amounts specify a traditional clipping distortion; the signal is multiplied by 2^value ("two to the power of the value") and any signal above a threshold is truncated to that threshold.
  • Negative amounts specify a fold back distortion; the signal is multiplied by 2^value ("two to the power of the value") and any signal above a threshold is folded back to below the threshold.


13. rEvb Reverb Send

Specifies the amount of signal to send to the reverb unit.


14. chor Chorus Send

Specifies the amount of signal to send to the chorus unit.


15. dely Delay Send

Specifies the amount of signal to send to the primary delay unit.


16. dly2 Delay 2 Send

Specifies the amount of signal to send to the secondary delay unit.

Please note that having this parameter set to non-zero in any of your tracks, will activate the secondary delay unit, incurring a modest DSP resource penalty.


Context menu

The following context menu options are available on a track's 'GLob' page;

  • 'raiS MVL1' (raise master volume by one) raises the master volume perceptually by reducing the master volume ('M.VoL'/'MStr VoL' under the 1/Cd key) of all other tracks by one. Use this feature if you need to raise the volume of one track beyond 127 (max). Please note that the attenuation is an absolute value, and as a result some tracks may have their volume reduced to 0 and become inaudible.
  • 'raiS MVL8' (raise master volume by eight) raises the master volume perceptually by reducing the master volume ('M.VoL'/'MStr VoL' under the 1/Cd key) of all other tracks by eight. Use this feature if you need to raise the volume of one track beyond 127 (max). Please note that the attenuation is an absolute value, and as a result some tracks may have their volume reduced to 0 and become inaudible.


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